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  5. Story 1 - Wagga Wagga
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Teacher Information

Keeping Warm

This teaching-learning sequence is based on additional content relating to how insulation of a warm body can control heat transfer. It has been designed as an extension to a Stage 4 unit of work in which students have gained an understanding of heat energy. The activities could be included if teachers wish to extend student learning beyond the scope of the syllabus essential content.



Transcript text

Well, we had fire and of course, sleeping by the fire, we kept warm. We used to build little breakwinds, to lie away from the wind, and dug holes in the ground, long trenches, rolled hot stones into them, covered them over and we lay on those and when we didn't have the stones we would drag the ashes into them and cover them over and lay on that too. And the children would come along, we'd cuddle up to the children; the dog was a great blanket too for us and in some places, they would heat the stones and wrap them in skins, kangaroo skins or possum skins and they would use those to lie on.

Classifying Animals

This teaching-learning sequence has been designed as an introduction to using keys. It could be incorporated into a Stage 4 unit such as Living Things, provided in Science 7-10 Advice on Programming and Assessment.

An extension activity is provided for teachers who wish to develop student learning beyond the scope of the essential syllabus content. The activity is based on additional content and involves students using computer software to design a key to identify some traditional Aboriginal tools, weapons or devices.

Transcript text

Well, in the Dreamtime, man and animal were one, and men and animals could change into each other in what we call 'shape shifting'. Animals could become men, men could become animals. Trees too come into the equation too. Trees could become men, men could become animals. And from them a lot of us got totems; that's where we get a lot of the totems from, those places. And Dreamtime is a time of magic and people could change into animals and they did not want to change back. They felt so secure there that they wouldn't change back and over the thousands of years since the Dreamtime, the ability to change back has been lost.

Managing the Environment

This teaching-learning sequence is based on syllabus essential content and has been designed to be embedded in a Stage 5 unit of work in which students have gained an understanding of how human activities impact on the abiotic and biotic features of the environment.

Transcript text

Well, we used to camp in certain areas, you know, for the time it came... while we could hunt, while we could eat and live there, and then when the animals moved away from the hunters, it was time to move on and we moved on to a different camp. And we used to burn off so that by the time we came back the next time, all the new shoots would be there and all the animals would be coming back to their own eating grounds.

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