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Reflective Journal

How did you go about making links with your local Aboriginal community?

Jane Pearce
Jane Pearce

I spoke to the Aboriginal Community Liaison Officer at the District Office and she introduced me to a local community elder called Uncle Wes Marne. He told me how important he felt it was that Aboriginal perspectives be included in all units of work, right across the curriculum. He became my sounding board about the use of tools and weapons and he also helped me understand the protocols involved with dealing with Aboriginal communities. He really made the whole project real for me.

Fred Domingo
Fred Domingo

Within the local area, St Marys, it was difficult to find any Aboriginal contacts, so I had to search the district level and found help from the following people: District Office consultants, Aboriginal Educational Assistants and local Elders.

Maureen Wenzel
Maureen Wenzel

In some schools we have Aboriginal teachers, Aboriginal education assistants or Aboriginal education workers. The first point of contact would be those people. They'll be able to initiate the initial contact and there are a number of protocols that have to be observed when working with the Aboriginal community.

Rosanne Herat
Rosanne Herat

Through our District Office staff, through Aboriginal Education Assistants within Chifley College and we also knew of the local Elders in our area, so we approached them.

Maureen Johnson
Maureen Johnson

I would contact the local Aboriginal Education Consultant in our district, contact Aboriginal Elders, talk to our parents. I think thats the best place to start. Talk to your own parents of your Aboriginal students, ask them what they would like to see included in your curriculum area.

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