1. Home
  2. Aboriginal Languages
  3. Learning from each school's experience
  4. St Joseph's Walgett
  5. Lessons learnt in 2005
Print this page Reduce font size Increase font size

Lessons learnt in 2005

The three main topics are:

  • Writing teaching and learning units of work for Stages 1–3
  • Community language teachers taking a stage-specific teaching approach
  • Becoming an integrated part of the school community.

Writing teaching and learning units of work for Stages 1–3

'Although I hate programming I can see the value in it when I listen to other people talk about their programs.'

Yuwaalaraay Language Program worker, 18/11/05
  • Stage 1
    John Brown’s Stage 1 program contains a year scope and sequence and eight units of work. It is considered a draft (JB intends to continue working on it), but it provides a solid yearly overview on which to expand.
    Stage 1 Scope and Sequence Units of Work

'I think that [programming] was one of the biggest challenges because I had no idea about programming whatsoever, didn’t know what a program was and didn’t know how to put a program together. I think to me that was the biggest challenge of this year’s teachings.'

John Brown, CLT, St Josph's Walgett, 17/11/05

'The most positive outcome was the writing up of the programmes; the wording of the programmes according to the Syllabus and how I may go about teaching that in the year to come.'

John Brown, CLT, St Josph's Walgett, 17/11/05
  • Stages 2–3

'Challenges? Definitely again my programming would be a challenge.'

Karen Flick, CLT, St Josph's Walgett, 18/11/05

'[I’m] more at ease now since that we’ve done the workshops together. So programming would be one of my little highlights. I think I’m getting used to that. But yeah maybe next year more work with the programming stuff would be good. But that’s like programming for a term, which we had to do. That was just scary when we didn’t really sit down and do any of that stuff before you came. Then you showed us how to go through the steps and stuff, how to pull this from the HSIE unit and get this from the language unit to make a program.'

Karen Flick, CLT, St Josph's Walgett, 18/11/05)

'Because I do Years 3–6 and I’ve had these kids last year and this year, and I know where they’re up to now. So I’ve got the same kids and they’re fluent a bit more, with their speeches. They know when to pause, they know when to emphasise, especially their speeches, I really picked up on that bit. And they like comparing G/Y, so they know one words this in Yuwaalaraay and one words this in Gamilaraay. That’s a really good one to have I think.'

Karen Flick, CLT, St Josph's Walgett, 18/11/05

Community language teachers taking a stage-specific teaching approach

Karen Flick and John Brown

All classroom teachers focus on a particular stage because each stage requires different content and different teaching strategies and methodology. Teachers who focus on a single Stage seem to be the most effective teachers.

 

 

'After Karen came in and started to learn the language, Karen basically played with the big classes, the higher classes, she went in that direction. So basically from when Karen started, she started in the primary section. Me, I prefer to stay in the infants section. Although I’m not worried about which section I teach, Karen’s got a good program that works with them and she knows what she’s doing with the primary school section and I’ve got a good program [and] I know what I’m doing with the infants section. We both could do one another’s job, that’s not a problem, but we prefer to do our own jobs.'

John Brown, CLT, St Josph's Walgett, 17/11/05

'JB does the Kinder up to Year 2, so the Stage 1, and I don’t have to muck around doing single words and syllables and all of that stuff to make the word. When they get to me then we’re doing sentences, we’re doing suffixes, we’re doing all of that stuff. So I don’t have to worry about connecting all that with the little kids.'

Karen Flick, CLT, St Josph's Walgett, 17/11/05

'It’s better to keep the group of kids that you have to programming and me and JB do that real good.'

Karen Flick, CLT, St Josph's Walgett, 18/11/05

Becoming an integrated part of the school community

Teachers need to be ready to learn something new and overcome some fears.

John Brown, Community Language Tutor, St Joseph's Walgett
This video requires QuickTime to be installed.
Download and install the latest version of QuickTime.

'I think that the biggest challenge to any student that learns a new language is to be able to overcome the fear of venturing into a part that’s unknown to them. And when we set an Aboriginal language as the LOTE well Brother John Wright mentioned the LOTE in the school was going to be a local Aboriginal language dialect. Not only the students but even the teachers, the fear of the unknown was a little bit difficult to say. Questions were asked and questions were raised but of course once they seen it in action then the fears slowly disappeared. One of the teachers that was really against it now participates in it all the time.'

John Brown, CLT, St Josph's Walgett, 17/11/05

The Community Language Teachers must take on the extra role of promoting the language program.

Karen Flick, Community Language Tutor, St Joseph's Walgett
This video requires QuickTime to be installed.
Download and install the latest version of QuickTime.

'I think I’m more confident now with language issues within the school system. … Promoting more … every little thing that we do with the school I try to get in there with the language stuff, "maybe we should do this" and stuff like that, and that’s our whole-school focus on language. [It’s] not just one class or the Aboriginal students singing the song it’s the whole school doing it. … Well like I said you’ve got to have a voice and everyone’s got a voice, you just got to be willing to get up and boast about what’s good.'

Karen Flick, CLT, St Josph's Walgett, 18/11/05
Print this page Reduce font size Increase font size
Lessons learnt in 2005